Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from August, 2016

Kenya hosts commemoration to accelerate comprehensive implementation of WHO FCTC in the African Region

Nairobi, 25 February 2015 -- The WHO meeting to commemorate the implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) started in Nairobi today with members and participants commending great milestones but cautioning that a lot is still needing to be done to save lives from the tobacco epidemic. The meeting attended by Member States outlines the implementation status for each state and what still remains to be done to protect African citizens from tobacco use and tobacco-related deaths. Forty-three of the 47 member states have ratified the convention, with Eritrea, South Sudan and Malawi yet to ratify. Mozambique is a signatory. The meeting which was addressed by various speakers also commended and welcomed new members, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe. WHO Regional Director Dr Matshidiso Moeti, in her speech read on behalf by Kenya’s Country Representative, Dr Custodia Mandlhate, said that tobacco, a leading cause of death, illness and impoverishment, was one of the biggest public…

WHO celebrates 10 years of tobacco control in the African Region

Nairobi, 25 February 2015 – On 27 February, the World Health Organization (WHO) celebrates 10 years of implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) in the African Region. Tobacco kills an estimated 6 million people every year but the true impact remains untold due to the lag of several years between when people start using tobacco and when their health suffers. To date, 43 of 47 Member States in the WHO African Region have ratified the WHO FCTC and are implementing national tobacco policies, laws and regulations. However, much remains to be done and urgent actions are required to prevent the effects of this scourge of modern times. Besides premature death, the use of tobacco robs families of incomes, raises health care costs, and hinders economic developments. “WHO is committed to fighting this global tobacco epidemic and the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control reaffirms peoples’ right to the highest standard of health.  All stakeholders must counte…

Safe breastfeeding key to improve children's health

Brazzaville, 12 January 2015 – Every day an estimated 8000 children die in sub-Saharan Africa from easily preventable or treatable illnesses. Breastfeeding is one of the best ways to provide newborns, infants and young children with the nutrients that they need while protecting them against conditions such as pneumonia, diarrhoea, and measles. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding that starts within one hour after birth and lasts until a baby is six months old. Continued breastfeeding and appropriate complementary foods should be made available for up to two years of age and beyond. In mid-2013,WHO issued new guidelines for breastfeeding and the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV. These recommendations were intended for use in resource-poor settings in low-and middle-income countries. Read the full press release here

Sexual and intimate partner violence affects millions in Africa

Brazzaville, 5 January 2015 – In the African Region, one in five girls have been sexually abused during childhood, with estimates from some countries placing that proportion closer to one in three. This startling statistic is highlighted in the newly released Global status report on violence prevention 2014. The report – the first of its kind – features data collected from 27 countries in the African Region and around the world. It highlights some of the key strategies for preventing sexual and intimate partner violence by promoting gender equity, creating a climate of non-tolerance for violence, and starting prevention efforts at a young age. According to the report, intimate partner violence is a significant social and public health problem affecting 36.6% of ever-partnered women in the African Region. Read the full press release here